Cope was the first football announcer inducted into the National Radio Hall of Fame.

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Myron Cope

Myron Cope was born Myron Sydney Kopelman in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on January 23, 1929. Originally a journalist, Cope worked for the Daily Times in Erie, Pennsylvania before writing for Sports Illustrated.  A move to Pittsburgh led him to radio station WTAE, where his unique nasal voice and excitable nature brought him to the attention of the Pittsburgh Steelers football team. In 1970, the team hired him as color commentator, a task he handled for 35 years on stations WDVE-FM and WBGG-AM. During that time, Cope entertained fans with his "Terrible Towel" (a stunt that began when he urged Steelers fans to stir up excitement by waving gold dish towels) and such unique catchphrases as Hum-Hah!, Okel Dokel, and Yoi! (A variation on that expression, Double Yoi, was the title of Cope's 2002 autobiography.)  Cope retired from the broadcast booth in 2005, concluding a 35-year run with the Steelers. That summer, he received the Pete Rozelle Award for long time exceptional contributions to pro football in television and radio. Myron Cope died on February 27, 2008. Myron Cope was inducted into the Radio Hall of Fame in 2005.

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In 1970, the Pittsburgh Steelers hired Myron Cope to handle play-by-play, a task he handled for 35 years on stations WBGG and WDVE.   
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