One of Stamberg’s most memorable interviews was with Nobel Prize–winning economist

Milton Friedman. 

 

© 2017 National Radio Hall Of Fame 

Susan Stamberg

Susan Stamberg, Special Correspondent for National Public Radio, was the first woman to anchor a national nightly news program on a regular basis. Starting in 1972, Stamberg served as co-host of NPR’s All Things Considered for 14 years. She then hosted NPR’s Weekend Edition—Sunday from its premiere in January 1987 through October 1989. Known for her conversational style, intelligence, and knack for finding an interesting story, Stamberg has been called “the closest thing to an enlightened humanist on the radio.” Her thousands of interviews include conversations with Nancy Reagan, Annie Liebowitz, Rosa Parks and James Baldwin. A native of New York City, Stamberg is one of the pioneers of National Public Radio, joining them in 1971. Prior to that, she served as producer, program director and general manager of WAMU/Washington, DC. Stamberg is author of two books: Every Night at Five: Susan Stamberg’s All Things Considered Book and Talk: NPR’s Susan Stamberg Considers All Things. She also co-edited The Wedding Cake in the Middle of the Road. Stamberg earned a bachelor’s degree from Barnard College and has been awarded numerous honorary degrees, including a Doctor of Humane Letters from Dartmouth College. Susan Stamberg was inducted into the Radio Hall of Fame in 1996.

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Susan Stamberg, was the first woman to anchor a national nightly news program on a regular basis.     
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